Our fresh soups

Seasonality

In season all year round

Scotty Brand Fresh Soups

Scotty Brand offers you a range of five delicious fresh soups, made to the Sword family recipes and using only the best ingredients.  They are classic Scottish soups and are packed with fresh vegetables.  Simply heat and enjoy  – all the hard work has been done for you and none of the goodness taken out.

Vegetable soup

Delicious mixed vegetables made into a special Scotty soup.

Pea & Ham soup

A traditional soup of split green peas and ham.

Scotch Broth

A classic Scottish soup of vegetables and barley, prepared with lamb stock as you would find in the traditional recipe.

Lentil soup

A hearty Scottish soup with lentils and carrots, cooked in a ham stock.

Tomato & Basil soup

A deliciously rich tomato soup with a hint of basil.

Chicken & Rice soup

A Scottish soup of chicken, rice and leeks, traditionally known as Cock-a-leekie.

Scotty's fresh soups range

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know?

Where to buy

  • The earliest archaeological evidence for the consumption of soup dates back to 6000 BC, and it was hippopotamus soup. Our tasty vegetable soup thankfully doesn’t contain hippopotamus, but it is packed with fresh vegetables including carrot, onion and potato.
  • Scotch Broth was originally a poor man’s meal, made from the scrag end of lamb boiled up with barley and root vegetables.
  • Boswell, in his writings on the life of Dr Johnson during their tour of Scotland in 1773, tells that the good doctor ate several platefuls of Scotch Broth.  In answer to the enquiry “You never ate it before?” Johnson apparently replied ” No sir, but I don’t care how soon I eat it again”.
  • We’ve called our soup Chicken & Rice so that people will quickly know what is in it, but it is traditionally known as Cock-a-leekie from the chicken and leeks used in its preparation.
  • A variety of recipes for Cock-a-Leekie date back as far as the 16th century.  Some recommend adding prunes to the soup during cooking, or serving it alongside stewed prunes.
  • Lentils don’t grow well in the Scottish climate, but lentil soup has been a favourite in the country for generations.  This is possibly because lentils have a slightly meaty flavour and have been used as a substitute for more expensive meat through the ages.   Another theory is that lentils were made popular as they were imported through Scottish ports from India during the days of the Raj.
  • Tomato soup is regularly voted one of the top comfort foods.  One of the first known written recipes was by Maria Parloa in 1872.
  • Pease pudding hot, pease pudding cold, pease pudding in the pot, nine days old!  “Pease” is an archaic form of the word “pea”. Pease pudding was a nutritious, cheap dish, made from dried peas boiled up with salt pork, which made it ideal for sailors on long voyages and is the origin of pea and ham soup.

Typical values per 100g:

Vegetable soup

Energy 214kJ / 50kcal; fat 0g; of which saturates 0g; carbohydrate 8.7g; of which sugar 0.6g; ; fibre 2.7g; protein 1.8g; salt 0.53g.

Scotch Broth

Energy 197kJ / 46kcal; fat 0.4g; of which saturates 0.1g; carbohydrate 8.5g; of which sugar 0.6g; ; fibre 2g; protein 1.3g; salt 0.60g.

Lentil soup

Energy 289kJ / 68kcal; fat 0.3g; of which saturates 0.1g; carbohydrate 10.4g; of which sugar 1.5g; fibre 3.8g; protein 3.9g; salt 0.4g.

Tomato & Basil soup

Energy 148kJ / 35kcal; fat 1.1g; of which saturates 0.7g; carbohydrate 4.2g; of which sugar 2.6g; ; fibre 2.2g; protein 0.9g; salt 0.38g.

Chicken & Rice soup

Energy 137kJ / 32kcal; fat 0.4g; of which saturates 0.2g; ; carbohydrate 5.9g; of which sugar 0.5g; fibre 0.5g; protein 1.3g; salt 0.58g.

Pea & Ham soup

Energy 326kJ / 77kcal; fat 1.4g; of which saturates 0.7g; ; carbohydrate 10.2g; of which sugar 0.4g; fibre 4.1g; protein 3.8g; salt 0.5g.